City of Forts and Fables 

The people of Kerman were among the pioneers in the discovery of metal. Tal‐e‐Eblis near Kerman is considered one of the oldest copper smelting centers in the world. The inhabitants of modern day Kerman province, alongside other late Chalcolithic era people in Iran and Mesopotamia, led the way to complex societies and laid the first foundations of civilization. This development can be clearly traced to historic mounds at Yahya and Shahdad, where the world’s first trade flag was discovered. The flag, dating back to 4th  millennium BC, served as the insignia of merchants on Lapis Lazuli route who transported precious and semi‐precious stones from east of Iran to Elamite, Sumerian and Egyptian cities.

 

Kerman is also blessed with breathtaking landscapes which beckon travelers to return. Located near the magnificent Lut Desert, Kerman stands at 1,755 meters elevation with vast turquoise skies and surrounded by mountains. The history of Kerman is interwoven with legends of the Silk Road. This city was originally a stronghold and Ghale‐Dokhtar and Ardeshir forts on its foothills are testament to that time and recount the tales about transfer of power between Parthian and Sassanian dynasties.

 

As the story of Ghale‐Dokhtar goes, Kerman was known as Govashir at the time of Parthians before the 3rd century, until one day the daughter of Haftvad, the ruler of the city, found a worm in an apple. She took the creature as an omen of good fortune. Having realized the value of the worm, Haftvad provided a special place to keep it safe and in return, the worm made him a fortune. When Ardeshir, the assanian king, heard about Haftvad’s wealth, he deceitfully poisoned the worm and by doing so put an end to the reign of Haftvad and his seven sons. Ferdowsi, the celebrated 10th century Iranian poet, relates the name of Kerman to this worm (kerm in Persian language) which probably has roots in Chinese fairytales of silk production in China and how its secrets were revealed.

 

Other scholars relate the name of Kerman to “Karam”, the Persian word for generosity, and Kerman as the city of generous people. The name of Kerman has been associated with several other ancient terms as well; for instance, the Elamite Port of Magan or Makkan, which also represents Makran region, is believed to be related to Kerman region. However, the term “Kermania” in Herodotus history and in Achaemenid tablets, is the most evident reference to Kerman’s name. Post‐Islamic tales also tell us about the history of this city. An interesting example of these stories, is one about the Turkan Khatun, the Gharakhatinan Queen in the 11th century, which narrates how she danced with her drunken stepson and consequently went through a course of events that changed the history of Kerman. As a literary and science enthusiast, she made numerous contributions to the city, like Ghobé Sabz (Turkan Khatun Madrassa) and an exquisite copy of Quran, which is registered as a National Cultural Heritage.

 

There are also a large number of monuments from the Islamic era in Kerman, each offering unique features to visitors, such as Jabalieh Dome from Seljuq era, Ganj‐Ali‐Khan Complex from Safavids’ reign and Vakil Complex from Qajar epoch. The most recent one is Morsalin Hospital, founded by Christian missionaries in late Qajar era, which represent the modern times in Iran. With 7 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Kerman is a city which immerses visitors in culture and history.

Kerman

The people of Kerman were among the pioneers in the discovery of metal. Tal‐e‐Eblis near Kerman is considered one of the oldest copper smelting centers in the world. The inhabitants of modern day Kerman province, alongside other late Chalcolithic era people in Iran and Mesopotamia, led the way to complex societies and laid the first foundations of civilization. This development can be clearly traced to historic mounds at Yahya and Shahdad, where the world’s first trade flag was discovered. The flag, dating back to 4th  millennium BC, served as the insignia of merchants on Lapis Lazuli route who transported precious and semi‐precious stones from east of Iran to Elamite, Sumerian and Egyptian cities.

 

Kerman is also blessed with breathtaking landscapes which beckon travelers to return. Located near the magnificent Lut Desert, Kerman stands at 1,755 meters elevation with vast turquoise skies and surrounded by mountains. The history of Kerman is interwoven with legends of the Silk Road. This city was originally a stronghold and Ghale‐Dokhtar and Ardeshir forts on its foothills are testament to that time and recount the tales about transfer of power between Parthian and Sassanian dynasties.

 

As the story of Ghale‐Dokhtar goes, Kerman was known as Govashir at the time of Parthians before the 3rd century, until one day the daughter of Haftvad, the ruler of the city, found a worm in an apple. She took the creature as an omen of good fortune. Having realized the value of the worm, Haftvad provided a special place to keep it safe and in return, the worm made him a fortune. When Ardeshir, the assanian king, heard about Haftvad’s wealth, he deceitfully poisoned the worm and by doing so put an end to the reign of Haftvad and his seven sons. Ferdowsi, the celebrated 10th century Iranian poet, relates the name of Kerman to this worm (kerm in Persian language) which probably has roots in Chinese fairytales of silk production in China and how its secrets were revealed.

 

Other scholars relate the name of Kerman to “Karam”, the Persian word for generosity, and Kerman as the city of generous people. The name of Kerman has been associated with several other ancient terms as well; for instance, the Elamite Port of Magan or Makkan, which also represents Makran region, is believed to be related to Kerman region. However, the term “Kermania” in Herodotus history and in Achaemenid tablets, is the most evident reference to Kerman’s name. Post‐Islamic tales also tell us about the history of this city. An interesting example of these stories, is one about the Turkan Khatun, the Gharakhatinan Queen in the 11th century, which narrates how she danced with her drunken stepson and consequently went through a course of events that changed the history of Kerman. As a literary and science enthusiast, she made numerous contributions to the city, like Ghobé Sabz (Turkan Khatun Madrassa) and an exquisite copy of Quran, which is registered as a National Cultural Heritage.

 

There are also a large number of monuments from the Islamic era in Kerman, each offering unique features to visitors, such as Jabalieh Dome from Seljuq era, Ganj‐Ali‐Khan Complex from Safavids’ reign and Vakil Complex from Qajar epoch. The most recent one is Morsalin Hospital, founded by Christian missionaries in late Qajar era, which represent the modern times in Iran. With 7 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Kerman is a city which immerses visitors in culture and history.

Kerman

The people of Kerman were among the pioneers in the discovery of metal. Tal‐e‐Eblis near Kerman is considered one of the oldest copper smelting centers in the world. The inhabitants of modern day Kerman province, alongside other late Chalcolithic era people in Iran and Mesopotamia, led the way to complex societies and laid the first foundations of civilization. This development can be clearly traced to historic mounds at Yahya and Shahdad, where the world’s first trade flag was discovered. The flag, dating back to 4th  millennium BC, served as the insignia of merchants on Lapis Lazuli route who transported precious and semi‐precious stones from east of Iran to Elamite, Sumerian and Egyptian cities.

 

Kerman is also blessed with breathtaking landscapes which beckon travelers to return. Located near the magnificent Lut Desert, Kerman stands at 1,755 meters elevation with vast turquoise skies and surrounded by mountains. The history of Kerman is interwoven with legends of the Silk Road. This city was originally a stronghold and Ghale‐Dokhtar and Ardeshir forts on its foothills are testament to that time and recount the tales about transfer of power between Parthian and Sassanian dynasties.

 

As the story of Ghale‐Dokhtar goes, Kerman was known as Govashir at the time of Parthians before the 3rd century, until one day the daughter of Haftvad, the ruler of the city, found a worm in an apple. She took the creature as an omen of good fortune. Having realized the value of the worm, Haftvad provided a special place to keep it safe and in return, the worm made him a fortune. When Ardeshir, the assanian king, heard about Haftvad’s wealth, he deceitfully poisoned the worm and by doing so put an end to the reign of Haftvad and his seven sons. Ferdowsi, the celebrated 10th century Iranian poet, relates the name of Kerman to this worm (kerm in Persian language) which probably has roots in Chinese fairytales of silk production in China and how its secrets were revealed.

 

Other scholars relate the name of Kerman to “Karam”, the Persian word for generosity, and Kerman as the city of generous people. The name of Kerman has been associated with several other ancient terms as well; for instance, the Elamite Port of Magan or Makkan, which also represents Makran region, is believed to be related to Kerman region. However, the term “Kermania” in Herodotus history and in Achaemenid tablets, is the most evident reference to Kerman’s name. Post‐Islamic tales also tell us about the history of this city. An interesting example of these stories, is one about the Turkan Khatun, the Gharakhatinan Queen in the 11th century, which narrates how she danced with her drunken stepson and consequently went through a course of events that changed the history of Kerman. As a literary and science enthusiast, she made numerous contributions to the city, like Ghobé Sabz (Turkan Khatun Madrassa) and an exquisite copy of Quran, which is registered as a National Cultural Heritage.

 

There are also a large number of monuments from the Islamic era in Kerman, each offering unique features to visitors, such as Jabalieh Dome from Seljuq era, Ganj‐Ali‐Khan Complex from Safavids’ reign and Vakil Complex from Qajar epoch. The most recent one is Morsalin Hospital, founded by Christian missionaries in late Qajar era, which represent the modern times in Iran. With 7 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Kerman is a city which immerses visitors in culture and history.

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