City of Art and Commerce

There seems to be a hidden relationship between paradise and Tabriz, with many mystics and poets such as Khaghani Shervani referring to this city as their haven and final refuge. Some scholars believe that the paradise mentioned in the Torah corresponds to the position of the city of Tabriz. They have also correlated the word Adam, which means red man in Hebrew, with the Tabriz’s colorful Sorkhab Mountains. The name of Tabriz is as mysterious as its history. Some scholars have related the name of Tabriz with the Tarui and Tarmakisa castle mentioned in the 8th Century BC in the report of Sargon II (the King of Assyria) and some have also compared it with the name of Tomyris, the Queen of Massageteans. Other valid documents related to the etymology of the word “Tabriz” refer to the Greek word “Tabpis”, as in the works of Ptolemy, or the town of Thebarmaish near Ganzak, which was burned by Heraclius of Rome.

 

Tabriz hosted Silk Road travelers between the two important Mongol capitals, Beijing and Tabriz, where Marco Polo was tasked with transporting a beautiful princess of Beijing to Tabriz. Three centuries before Marco Polo declared Tabriz as the center of international trade, Moqaddasi, the great Islamic geographer, believed that Tabriz was more important than Baghdad which was the capital of that time. All travelers to Tabriz agreed on one thing: Tabriz was a major center of commerce. Today, the Tabriz Bazaar is known as the world’s largest roofed and interconnected complex as well as a UNESCO site.

 

Tabriz is also famous as a city of ‘firsts’ in Iran. For example, the people of Tabriz were the first to begin the movement for democracy in Iran with the Constitutional Revolution led by Sattarkhan (about a century after the Great French Revolution), during which the National Assembly of Iran was recognized. Amid the Constitutional Revolution, an American soldier, Howard Conklin Baskerville was killed, and as a tribute Sattarkhan put his gun inside the Iranian flag and sent it to America. Today his memorial statue and grave are in Tabriz.

Tabriz

There seems to be a hidden relationship between paradise and Tabriz, with many mystics and poets such as Khaghani Shervani referring to this city as their haven and final refuge. Some scholars believe that the paradise mentioned in the Torah corresponds to the position of the city of Tabriz. They have also correlated the word Adam, which means red man in Hebrew, with the Tabriz’s colorful Sorkhab Mountains. The name of Tabriz is as mysterious as its history. Some scholars have related the name of Tabriz with the Tarui and Tarmakisa castle mentioned in the 8th Century BC in the report of Sargon II (the King of Assyria) and some have also compared it with the name of Tomyris, the Queen of Massageteans. Other valid documents related to the etymology of the word “Tabriz” refer to the Greek word “Tabpis”, as in the works of Ptolemy, or the town of Thebarmaish near Ganzak, which was burned by Heraclius of Rome.

 

Tabriz hosted Silk Road travelers between the two important Mongol capitals, Beijing and Tabriz, where Marco Polo was tasked with transporting a beautiful princess of Beijing to Tabriz. Three centuries before Marco Polo declared Tabriz as the center of international trade, Moqaddasi, the great Islamic geographer, believed that Tabriz was more important than Baghdad which was the capital of that time. All travelers to Tabriz agreed on one thing: Tabriz was a major center of commerce. Today, the Tabriz Bazaar is known as the world’s largest roofed and interconnected complex as well as a UNESCO site.

 

Tabriz is also famous as a city of ‘firsts’ in Iran. For example, the people of Tabriz were the first to begin the movement for democracy in Iran with the Constitutional Revolution led by Sattarkhan (about a century after the Great French Revolution), during which the National Assembly of Iran was recognized. Amid the Constitutional Revolution, an American soldier, Howard Conklin Baskerville was killed, and as a tribute Sattarkhan put his gun inside the Iranian flag and sent it to America. Today his memorial statue and grave are in Tabriz.

Tabriz

There seems to be a hidden relationship between paradise and Tabriz, with many mystics and poets such as Khaghani Shervani referring to this city as their haven and final refuge. Some scholars believe that the paradise mentioned in the Torah corresponds to the position of the city of Tabriz. They have also correlated the word Adam, which means red man in Hebrew, with the Tabriz’s colorful Sorkhab Mountains. The name of Tabriz is as mysterious as its history. Some scholars have related the name of Tabriz with the Tarui and Tarmakisa castle mentioned in the 8th Century BC in the report of Sargon II (the King of Assyria) and some have also compared it with the name of Tomyris, the Queen of Massageteans. Other valid documents related to the etymology of the word “Tabriz” refer to the Greek word “Tabpis”, as in the works of Ptolemy, or the town of Thebarmaish near Ganzak, which was burned by Heraclius of Rome.

 

Tabriz hosted Silk Road travelers between the two important Mongol capitals, Beijing and Tabriz, where Marco Polo was tasked with transporting a beautiful princess of Beijing to Tabriz. Three centuries before Marco Polo declared Tabriz as the center of international trade, Moqaddasi, the great Islamic geographer, believed that Tabriz was more important than Baghdad which was the capital of that time. All travelers to Tabriz agreed on one thing: Tabriz was a major center of commerce. Today, the Tabriz Bazaar is known as the world’s largest roofed and interconnected complex as well as a UNESCO site.

 

Tabriz is also famous as a city of ‘firsts’ in Iran. For example, the people of Tabriz were the first to begin the movement for democracy in Iran with the Constitutional Revolution led by Sattarkhan (about a century after the Great French Revolution), during which the National Assembly of Iran was recognized. Amid the Constitutional Revolution, an American soldier, Howard Conklin Baskerville was killed, and as a tribute Sattarkhan put his gun inside the Iranian flag and sent it to America. Today his memorial statue and grave are in Tabriz.

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