Travel to Iran from Pakistan by Road

Travel to Iran from Pakistan

Travel to Iran from Pakistan by Road

Travel to Iran from Pakistan and the information about this topic is the fact we are going to talk about. You may be aware of the well-known border crossing between Taftan and Mirjaveh in the center of Balochistan if you’ve ever fantasized about taking a road trip from Pakistan to Iran or the opposite direction. The Gabd Rimdan Border, a significant border crossing between Pakistan and Iran, was just opened, which many tourists might not be aware of.

A road trip from Pakistan to Iran via the Gabd Rimdan border covers hundreds of kilometers along the picturesque Makran coast of Balochistan and ensures hours of breathtaking views. This border is located between the port cities of Gwadar and Chabahar and is suitable to travel to Iran.

The Gabd Rimdan Border offers an intriguing alternative to flying by offering a substantially faster route to Iran from Karachi and allowing passengers to explore the lovely cities of Gwadar and Chabahar along the way.

The best way to travel to Iran from Pakistan

The best way to travel to Iran from Pakistan is by Road

Traveling from Pakistan to Iran by road is a viable choice if you wish to avoid paying for airline tickets, and enjoy the beauty and adventure of overland travel or any combination of these things. Numerous border crossings exist between the two countries, all of which are located in Balochistan. Two borders—the Taftan-Mirjaveh Border and the Gabd Rimdan Border—are accessible to the typical traveler, even though some border crossings are extremely dangerous and only open to locals to help them to travel to Iran.

The Taftan-Mirjaveh Border, located deep inside Balochistan, is without a doubt the most frequently used land border crossing between Pakistan and Iran. This land boundary is well-known to travelers, pilgrims, and businesspeople from all over the world, and there is a wealth of trustworthy information available about it. Briefly stated, the Taftan-Mirjaveh Border connects the Iranian city of Zahedan with Pakistan’s Chagai District. From there, travelers can connect to other Pakistani cities by air or ground transportation after traveling for more than 600 kilometers to Quetta.

The Taftan-Mirjaveh Border’s isolation is its worst drawback. In addition to being completely desolate, the area between the border and Quetta is also relatively remote relative to other Pakistani cities. For instance, it would take much less time to drive directly to Iran via the Makran Coastal Highway passing by Gwadar than it would to travel from Karachi to Quetta for ten hours and then another nine hours to Taftan – and this is now quite simply because to the Gabd Rimdan Border!

In addition to these land border crossings, it is also feasible to travel by boat from the Gwadar side to Iran; however, only locals are permitted to do so, and your Balochi linguistic proficiency may be put to the test.

Gabd Rimdan Border

The Gabd Rimdan Border is open to passport and permission holders to travel to Iran, unlike the smaller border crossings in between. This comprises:

  1. Pakistani nationals holding current Iran visas and passports
  2. Iranian nationals in possession of valid Pakistani visas and passports
  3. Baloch citizens who have a valid border crossing permission
  4. individuals from third countries with current visas for both Iran and Pakistan.

It may be a little difficult with the last group on the list. Generally speaking, crossing the border from Iran to Pakistan via the Gabd Rimdan Border is trouble-free. After passing through Pakistani immigration, you are met by Pakistani officials. They will request that you drive them to Karachi nonstop in their car. They will ship your car to Karachi if you have one. Sadly, you won’t be able to visit Gwadar, Hingol National Park, or any of the stunning beaches along the way because Westerners are not permitted to travel freely in the Pakistani state of Balochistan.

The Gabd Rimdan Border is where it gets exceedingly difficult for a third passport bearer to enter Iran from Pakistan. As previously indicated, special approval (NOC) and security escort are required for foreigners to cross into Pakistan’s Balochistan province. While the Taftan border crossing has a fairly well-known protocol, the Gabd Rimdan border has no information available, which has led some individuals to believe that foreigners are not permitted to pass this border to travel to Iran.

Pakistan and Balouchestan

Pakistan and Balouchestan

Residents of Balochistan from both sides of the border are permitted to visit the other side with just a permit to facilitate family reunions and other activities. You can receive this permit at the DC House in Gwadar for things like visiting friends and family. Travelers are only permitted to visit the city they specified, and the permit is valid for one to three months. Balochistan inhabitants who intend to travel to other locations in Iran must apply for a visa as a Pakistani nationals.

Also, keep in mind that permit holders have less access to the border’s opening hours than do people with visas and that the immigration process may be more rigid and arbitrary.

Visa for Travel to Iran from Pakistan by road

An embassy visa is required for all other foreign nationals, including Pakistanis, to travel to Iran by car. This could be a tourist visa, a visa for a religious journey, a visa for business purposes, or something else. Although it is possible to submit your application for free using the official government website, it is strongly encouraged that you do so through an Iranian travel agency because there have been numerous instances of individual applicants’ requests for tourist visas being ignored or rejected.

After getting the approval form, you must print it off and deliver it, along with your passport, to the embassy or consulate of your choice. A pre-filled check will then be issued to you, and you will be instructed to visit a specified bank to pay your visa fee. You will then be instructed to pick up your passport and visa a few working days after submitting the receipt to the embassy or consulate.

Iranians only require a valid passport to enter their own country because they are nationals of the region. Iranians haven’t had any issues if they take a direct bus from Karachi to the border, despite some misunderstanding over whether NOC and security escort are necessary for Iranians heading back to their own country via the Gabd Rimdan Border.

How get to the Gabd Rimdan border from Pakistan

How get to the Gabd Rimdan border from Pakistan?

Buses run directly to the border from the Yousuf Goth bus station in Karachi. Al Mumtaz Coach can inform you of their availability. The alternative is to take a bus from Yousuf Goth to Gwadar and then a taxi to the border.

Private vehicles like a car, motorcycles, or even a bicycle can cross the boundary. Please review your insurance coverage and the laws of each country. The Pakistani authorities may urge you to ride in their car and send your own to Karachi if you travel to Iran or from Iran to Pakistan.

If you’re driving your car from Pakistan to Iran or vice versa, keep in mind that Pakistan and Iran have distinct driving directions, so exercise additional caution after crossing the Gabd Rimdan Border until you become acclimated to driving on the other side.

Security

Security

When traveling in Balochistan, safety is a top priority for both Iranians and Pakistanis. Balochistan does, however, experience a fair share of security concerns. The Gabe Rimdan Border is still relatively new, and there have been minimal modifications done in this isolated area, in contrast to the Taftan Mirjaveh Border, which has been used by travelers for many years and has subsequently been better secured.

Travelers in rural parts of Balochistan continue to be concerned about terrorist attacks and kidnappings. While military personnel is typically the target of state opposition attacks, there is always a chance that something could happen to civilians, especially foreign tourists. On both sides of the border, the rocky terrain is desolate and lonely, making it a haven for a wide range of people. The majority of Pakistanis who travel to Iran are Shia Muslims, thus there is a chance that there will be attacks with a religious motive as well.

Although big incidents are extremely unlikely, it is still crucial to maintain a low profile and attempt to blend in with the local population.

Robberies are common in Balochistan’s outlying regions. Criminals frequently target foreigners, particularly Farsi-speaking Iranians and Pakistanis. Travelers should keep a low profile, avoid going out at night, and if at all feasible, travel with a reliable local.

One of the most traditional and patriarchal nations in the world is Balochistan. Women never leave the house alone, and the idea of a woman traveling alone is hardly ever discussed. While I was fortunate enough to have local friends with me the majority of the time, the few occasions that I did have to travel in this area by myself were quite uncomfortable and I did not feel safe at all. Any female traveler should not attempt this voyage alone; instead, have a reliable male friend or family member with you at all times.

Which language is needed for traveling from Pakistan to Iran

Which language is needed for traveling from Pakistan to Iran by road?

Outside of Iran’s major cities, very few people speak English aside from a few English professors. Nobody, not even the border crossing guards at Gabd Rimdan! Up till Chabahar, there may be a few Urdu speakers, but further west, their numbers are close to zero. If you speak a little Balochi, that’s excellent, but bear in mind that regional dialects range widely from one another, and a person from a different town might not understand your dialect at all. The majority of Iran speaks Farsi, but not Pakistan.

Downloading an offline Farsi/Urdu/English translator tool would be your best choice for effective communication, along with learning some fundamental Urdu and Farsi words when you decide to travel to Iran.

 

Travel to Iran from Pakistan by Road

Travel to Iran from Pakistan

Travel to Iran from Pakistan by Road

Travel to Iran from Pakistan and the information about this topic is the fact we are going to talk about. You may be aware of the well-known border crossing between Taftan and Mirjaveh in the center of Balochistan if you’ve ever fantasized about taking a road trip from Pakistan to Iran or the opposite direction. The Gabd Rimdan Border, a significant border crossing between Pakistan and Iran, was just opened, which many tourists might not be aware of.

A road trip from Pakistan to Iran via the Gabd Rimdan border covers hundreds of kilometers along the picturesque Makran coast of Balochistan and ensures hours of breathtaking views. This border is located between the port cities of Gwadar and Chabahar and is suitable to travel to Iran.

The Gabd Rimdan Border offers an intriguing alternative to flying by offering a substantially faster route to Iran from Karachi and allowing passengers to explore the lovely cities of Gwadar and Chabahar along the way.

The best way to travel to Iran from Pakistan

The best way to travel to Iran from Pakistan is by Road

Traveling from Pakistan to Iran by road is a viable choice if you wish to avoid paying for airline tickets, and enjoy the beauty and adventure of overland travel or any combination of these things. Numerous border crossings exist between the two countries, all of which are located in Balochistan. Two borders—the Taftan-Mirjaveh Border and the Gabd Rimdan Border—are accessible to the typical traveler, even though some border crossings are extremely dangerous and only open to locals to help them to travel to Iran.

The Taftan-Mirjaveh Border, located deep inside Balochistan, is without a doubt the most frequently used land border crossing between Pakistan and Iran. This land boundary is well-known to travelers, pilgrims, and businesspeople from all over the world, and there is a wealth of trustworthy information available about it. Briefly stated, the Taftan-Mirjaveh Border connects the Iranian city of Zahedan with Pakistan’s Chagai District. From there, travelers can connect to other Pakistani cities by air or ground transportation after traveling for more than 600 kilometers to Quetta.

The Taftan-Mirjaveh Border’s isolation is its worst drawback. In addition to being completely desolate, the area between the border and Quetta is also relatively remote relative to other Pakistani cities. For instance, it would take much less time to drive directly to Iran via the Makran Coastal Highway passing by Gwadar than it would to travel from Karachi to Quetta for ten hours and then another nine hours to Taftan – and this is now quite simply because to the Gabd Rimdan Border!

In addition to these land border crossings, it is also feasible to travel by boat from the Gwadar side to Iran; however, only locals are permitted to do so, and your Balochi linguistic proficiency may be put to the test.

Gabd Rimdan Border

The Gabd Rimdan Border is open to passport and permission holders to travel to Iran, unlike the smaller border crossings in between. This comprises:

  1. Pakistani nationals holding current Iran visas and passports
  2. Iranian nationals in possession of valid Pakistani visas and passports
  3. Baloch citizens who have a valid border crossing permission
  4. individuals from third countries with current visas for both Iran and Pakistan.

It may be a little difficult with the last group on the list. Generally speaking, crossing the border from Iran to Pakistan via the Gabd Rimdan Border is trouble-free. After passing through Pakistani immigration, you are met by Pakistani officials. They will request that you drive them to Karachi nonstop in their car. They will ship your car to Karachi if you have one. Sadly, you won’t be able to visit Gwadar, Hingol National Park, or any of the stunning beaches along the way because Westerners are not permitted to travel freely in the Pakistani state of Balochistan.

The Gabd Rimdan Border is where it gets exceedingly difficult for a third passport bearer to enter Iran from Pakistan. As previously indicated, special approval (NOC) and security escort are required for foreigners to cross into Pakistan’s Balochistan province. While the Taftan border crossing has a fairly well-known protocol, the Gabd Rimdan border has no information available, which has led some individuals to believe that foreigners are not permitted to pass this border to travel to Iran.

Pakistan and Balouchestan

Pakistan and Balouchestan

Residents of Balochistan from both sides of the border are permitted to visit the other side with just a permit to facilitate family reunions and other activities. You can receive this permit at the DC House in Gwadar for things like visiting friends and family. Travelers are only permitted to visit the city they specified, and the permit is valid for one to three months. Balochistan inhabitants who intend to travel to other locations in Iran must apply for a visa as a Pakistani nationals.

Also, keep in mind that permit holders have less access to the border’s opening hours than do people with visas and that the immigration process may be more rigid and arbitrary.

Visa for Travel to Iran from Pakistan by road

An embassy visa is required for all other foreign nationals, including Pakistanis, to travel to Iran by car. This could be a tourist visa, a visa for a religious journey, a visa for business purposes, or something else. Although it is possible to submit your application for free using the official government website, it is strongly encouraged that you do so through an Iranian travel agency because there have been numerous instances of individual applicants’ requests for tourist visas being ignored or rejected.

After getting the approval form, you must print it off and deliver it, along with your passport, to the embassy or consulate of your choice. A pre-filled check will then be issued to you, and you will be instructed to visit a specified bank to pay your visa fee. You will then be instructed to pick up your passport and visa a few working days after submitting the receipt to the embassy or consulate.

Iranians only require a valid passport to enter their own country because they are nationals of the region. Iranians haven’t had any issues if they take a direct bus from Karachi to the border, despite some misunderstanding over whether NOC and security escort are necessary for Iranians heading back to their own country via the Gabd Rimdan Border.

How get to the Gabd Rimdan border from Pakistan

How get to the Gabd Rimdan border from Pakistan?

Buses run directly to the border from the Yousuf Goth bus station in Karachi. Al Mumtaz Coach can inform you of their availability. The alternative is to take a bus from Yousuf Goth to Gwadar and then a taxi to the border.

Private vehicles like a car, motorcycles, or even a bicycle can cross the boundary. Please review your insurance coverage and the laws of each country. The Pakistani authorities may urge you to ride in their car and send your own to Karachi if you travel to Iran or from Iran to Pakistan.

If you’re driving your car from Pakistan to Iran or vice versa, keep in mind that Pakistan and Iran have distinct driving directions, so exercise additional caution after crossing the Gabd Rimdan Border until you become acclimated to driving on the other side.

Security

Security

When traveling in Balochistan, safety is a top priority for both Iranians and Pakistanis. Balochistan does, however, experience a fair share of security concerns. The Gabe Rimdan Border is still relatively new, and there have been minimal modifications done in this isolated area, in contrast to the Taftan Mirjaveh Border, which has been used by travelers for many years and has subsequently been better secured.

Travelers in rural parts of Balochistan continue to be concerned about terrorist attacks and kidnappings. While military personnel is typically the target of state opposition attacks, there is always a chance that something could happen to civilians, especially foreign tourists. On both sides of the border, the rocky terrain is desolate and lonely, making it a haven for a wide range of people. The majority of Pakistanis who travel to Iran are Shia Muslims, thus there is a chance that there will be attacks with a religious motive as well.

Although big incidents are extremely unlikely, it is still crucial to maintain a low profile and attempt to blend in with the local population.

Robberies are common in Balochistan’s outlying regions. Criminals frequently target foreigners, particularly Farsi-speaking Iranians and Pakistanis. Travelers should keep a low profile, avoid going out at night, and if at all feasible, travel with a reliable local.

One of the most traditional and patriarchal nations in the world is Balochistan. Women never leave the house alone, and the idea of a woman traveling alone is hardly ever discussed. While I was fortunate enough to have local friends with me the majority of the time, the few occasions that I did have to travel in this area by myself were quite uncomfortable and I did not feel safe at all. Any female traveler should not attempt this voyage alone; instead, have a reliable male friend or family member with you at all times.

Which language is needed for traveling from Pakistan to Iran

Which language is needed for traveling from Pakistan to Iran by road?

Outside of Iran’s major cities, very few people speak English aside from a few English professors. Nobody, not even the border crossing guards at Gabd Rimdan! Up till Chabahar, there may be a few Urdu speakers, but further west, their numbers are close to zero. If you speak a little Balochi, that’s excellent, but bear in mind that regional dialects range widely from one another, and a person from a different town might not understand your dialect at all. The majority of Iran speaks Farsi, but not Pakistan.

Downloading an offline Farsi/Urdu/English translator tool would be your best choice for effective communication, along with learning some fundamental Urdu and Farsi words when you decide to travel to Iran.

 

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