Iranian Saffron

Iranian SaffronIran is the biggest producer of Saffron in the world, with 90% of global production. Saffron has been cultivated in Iran for centuries and its usage dates back to 3500 years ago in ancient Persia, when it was highly prized and used in special ceremonies and celebrations like the ancient Persian New Year, Nowruz. Saffron was used as a spice, fragrance, and dye by the Achaemenians.  Some scholars believe that saffron may have originated in a wider geographical area which included Greece, Asia Minor, and Persia, and later spread eastward to India and China. Ancient Persians sold and introduced Iranian saffron to Greeks, Romans, Chinese, and Arabs, and later on, it was cultivated in parts of Europe and North Africa.  It still figures prominently in Iranian culture and is widely applied in Persian cuisine.

 

Saffron (Crocus sativus), is a bulbous perennial herb, a plant that does not grow from seeds; the underground bulbs divide to produce new plants. Flowers emerge in autumn; the outstanding feature of the purple-colored flower which is collected as saffron is its three red stigmas 25 – 30 mm long, which droop over the petals.

 

Saffron harvest season begins in early September and lasts for about two weeks. During this time, men and women head to the fields, covered with the eye-catching purple flowers, before sunrise and before the flowers have bloomed. It is a sensitive and labor-intensive process to harvest the flowers and to separate and dry the stigmas. It takes 170 flowers to produce only one gram of saffron, which is why saffron is the most expensive spice in the world.

 

Saffron has also been praised for its miraculous medicinal properties in traditional medicine by various ancient cultures. Ancient texts on Ayurveda mention the herb’s use as an aphrodisiac, which probably explains the kesar milk or saffron milk (saffron mixed with milk) that is a part of the wedding night ritual.  The curative properties of saffron were described in The Canon of Medicine, the encyclopedia of medicine compiled by Avicenna (Ibn Sina), the Persian polymath, in 1025. The Canon of Medicine represented an overview of medical knowledge in the Islamic world at the time, which also incorporated earlier traditions of Greco-Roman, Persian, Chinese, and Indian medicine. The therapeutic properties of saffron as described by Avicenna included its effectiveness as an antidepressant, hypnotic, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, bronchodilatory, aphrodisiac, inducer of labour, emmenagogue, and others. Most of these effects have been studied in modern pharmacology and are well-documented. The pharmacological findings on saffron and its constituents, including crocin, crocetin, and safranal, are similar to those found in Avicenna’s work.

 

Saffron really is a storehouse of diverse health benefits and disease-prevention properties. What is even more impressive is that quite unlike most pharmaceutical products promoted and sold by the corporate giants, saffron has no harmful side effects. Its preventative and therapeutic effects include the following:

 

Iranian saffron-preventative and therapeutic effects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As mentioned above, due to the hardships involved in cultivating and harvesting of saffron, it is the most precious spice in the world and called the ‘red gold. The current USD to Rial exchange rate in Iran has created a golden opportunity for travelers to purchase pure and exquisite Iranian saffron for just fifty-cents per gram! Considering all the wide-ranging health benefits of saffron compared to the cost of medications and difficult medical treatments, the Iranian saffron price is really an incredible deal. Saffron can easily be taken daily as a tea or in capsules, up to three grams per month safely. It can be stored for up to two years in a dry place away from light for maximum potency.

 

Iranian Saffron harvesting

 

Pasargad Tours Company has prepared a fantastic tour package for those who are interested in travel to Iran during the saffron harvest season.

 

 

Iranian Saffron

Iranian SaffronIran is the biggest producer of Saffron in the world, with 90% of global production. Saffron has been cultivated in Iran for centuries and its usage dates back to 3500 years ago in ancient Persia, when it was highly prized and used in special ceremonies and celebrations like the ancient Persian New Year, Nowruz. Saffron was used as a spice, fragrance, and dye by the Achaemenians.  Some scholars believe that saffron may have originated in a wider geographical area which included Greece, Asia Minor, and Persia, and later spread eastward to India and China. Ancient Persians sold and introduced Iranian saffron to Greeks, Romans, Chinese, and Arabs, and later on, it was cultivated in parts of Europe and North Africa.  It still figures prominently in Iranian culture and is widely applied in Persian cuisine.

 

Saffron (Crocus sativus), is a bulbous perennial herb, a plant that does not grow from seeds; the underground bulbs divide to produce new plants. Flowers emerge in autumn; the outstanding feature of the purple-colored flower which is collected as saffron is its three red stigmas 25 – 30 mm long, which droop over the petals.

 

Saffron harvest season begins in early September and lasts for about two weeks. During this time, men and women head to the fields, covered with the eye-catching purple flowers, before sunrise and before the flowers have bloomed. It is a sensitive and labor-intensive process to harvest the flowers and to separate and dry the stigmas. It takes 170 flowers to produce only one gram of saffron, which is why saffron is the most expensive spice in the world.

 

Saffron has also been praised for its miraculous medicinal properties in traditional medicine by various ancient cultures. Ancient texts on Ayurveda mention the herb’s use as an aphrodisiac, which probably explains the kesar milk or saffron milk (saffron mixed with milk) that is a part of the wedding night ritual.  The curative properties of saffron were described in The Canon of Medicine, the encyclopedia of medicine compiled by Avicenna (Ibn Sina), the Persian polymath, in 1025. The Canon of Medicine represented an overview of medical knowledge in the Islamic world at the time, which also incorporated earlier traditions of Greco-Roman, Persian, Chinese, and Indian medicine. The therapeutic properties of saffron as described by Avicenna included its effectiveness as an antidepressant, hypnotic, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, bronchodilatory, aphrodisiac, inducer of labour, emmenagogue, and others. Most of these effects have been studied in modern pharmacology and are well-documented. The pharmacological findings on saffron and its constituents, including crocin, crocetin, and safranal, are similar to those found in Avicenna’s work.

 

Saffron really is a storehouse of diverse health benefits and disease-prevention properties. What is even more impressive is that quite unlike most pharmaceutical products promoted and sold by the corporate giants, saffron has no harmful side effects. Its preventative and therapeutic effects include the following:

 

Iranian saffron-preventative and therapeutic effects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As mentioned above, due to the hardships involved in cultivating and harvesting of saffron, it is the most precious spice in the world and called the ‘red gold. The current USD to Rial exchange rate in Iran has created a golden opportunity for travelers to purchase pure and exquisite Iranian saffron for just fifty-cents per gram! Considering all the wide-ranging health benefits of saffron compared to the cost of medications and difficult medical treatments, the Iranian saffron price is really an incredible deal. Saffron can easily be taken daily as a tea or in capsules, up to three grams per month safely. It can be stored for up to two years in a dry place away from light for maximum potency.

 

Iranian Saffron harvesting

 

Pasargad Tours Company has prepared a fantastic tour package for those who are interested in travel to Iran during the saffron harvest season.

 

 

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